Background Illustrations provided by: http://edison.rutgers.edu/
Reblogged from currentsinbiology  188 notas
ucsdhealthsciences:

Another virus, another worry
Non-polio enteroviruses sound scary and they are quite common. They cause roughly 10 to 15 million infections in the United States each year, according to the Centers for Disease Control. Infants, children and teens are most likely to be affected, primarily because their immune systems haven’t previously been exposed to the pathogen.
Fortunately, enteroviruses typically don’t result in serious illness – think common cold – but there are exceptions. Some people can get very sick. Their hearts or brains may become infected. Despite the “non-polio” in the name, paralysis is a possibility, albeit remote.
One especially rare strain of enterovirus – enterovirus-D68  – is causing concern. In at least 16 states, more than 140 cases of enterovirus-D68 infection have been confirmed, mostly among children. Most patients recover without any treatment, but the virus (which tends to appear in the fall) may worsen breathing problems for some children.
“Children less than 5 years old and children with underlying asthma appear to be at greatest risk of having medical complications from EV-D68, Oklahoma epidemiologist Kristy Bradley, MD, told CNN. “If a child develops a cold or a cough, parents and caregivers should just watch the child a little more closely … if wheezing or asthma-like symptoms develop, medical care should be accessed immediately.”
There is no specific treatment for people with EV-D68, but there are standard precautions you can use to protect against infection. They are useful against similar viruses too.
Wash hands often with soap and water for 20 seconds, especially after changing diapers.
Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands.
Avoid kissing, hugging and sharing cups or eating utensils with people who are sick.
Disinfect frequently touched surfaces, such as toys and doorknobs, especially if someone is sick.

ucsdhealthsciences:

Another virus, another worry

Non-polio enteroviruses sound scary and they are quite common. They cause roughly 10 to 15 million infections in the United States each year, according to the Centers for Disease Control. Infants, children and teens are most likely to be affected, primarily because their immune systems haven’t previously been exposed to the pathogen.

Fortunately, enteroviruses typically don’t result in serious illness – think common cold – but there are exceptions. Some people can get very sick. Their hearts or brains may become infected. Despite the “non-polio” in the name, paralysis is a possibility, albeit remote.

One especially rare strain of enterovirus – enterovirus-D68  – is causing concern. In at least 16 states, more than 140 cases of enterovirus-D68 infection have been confirmed, mostly among children. Most patients recover without any treatment, but the virus (which tends to appear in the fall) may worsen breathing problems for some children.

“Children less than 5 years old and children with underlying asthma appear to be at greatest risk of having medical complications from EV-D68, Oklahoma epidemiologist Kristy Bradley, MD, told CNN. “If a child develops a cold or a cough, parents and caregivers should just watch the child a little more closely … if wheezing or asthma-like symptoms develop, medical care should be accessed immediately.”

There is no specific treatment for people with EV-D68, but there are standard precautions you can use to protect against infection. They are useful against similar viruses too.

  • Wash hands often with soap and water for 20 seconds, especially after changing diapers.
  • Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid kissing, hugging and sharing cups or eating utensils with people who are sick.
  • Disinfect frequently touched surfaces, such as toys and doorknobs, especially if someone is sick.
Reblogged from griseus  49 notas

volk-morya:

DEADLY BEAUTY: A Portrait of the Portuguese Man-of-War

The Portuguese Man-of-War is infamous for its painful sting, but one photographer finds the beauty inside this animal’s dangerous embrace.

The vibrant hues and ethereal body of the Portuguese man-of-war entice people to take a closer look, but beware - to those who draw too near, this delicate creature delivers a painful sting.

Being built like a glass-blown ship at full sail is what gave the man-of-war its nautical name. It’s also what enables the creatures to go where the wind takes them - even when that means foundering on the beach. This is where professional photographer Aaron Ansarov encounters them.

A retired combat photographer for the U.S. Navy, Ansarov has been collecting and photographing man-of-wars from a local Florida beach for the past two years now. “It’s an opportunity to explore a new world,” he says, and part of a wider photo project Ansarov started after he left the military in 2007. (Read about his project in National Geographic magazine.)

Read more - and view more photos and video - here.

Text credit: Jane J. Lee

Photo credit: Aaron Ansarov

Marabillosa.

Reblogged from scienceisbeauty  124 notas

scienceisbeauty:

Why is the Sea Salty?

When you are swimming in the ocean or sea, the last thing you want is a big mouth full of water. Its horrible because it is really salty. But why is it salty? This video looks into why the sea is salty and how it gets there. 

Video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EIDSMzXXzLM

Sources
www.palomar.edu/oceanography/salty_ocean.htm
www.utdallas.edu/~pujana/oceans/why.html
www.bbc.com/future/story/20140411-why-is-the-sea-so-salty

Video made by Luke Thomas

EsEinsteinium